Episode 11 with Jim Crossley and Toby Crawley: the Immutant two-step

jcrossleytobyToby Crawley (@tcrawley) and Jim Crossley (@jcrossley3) (shown to the left, respectively), among other things, are the primary instigators behind Immutant, the Clojure application platform built on top of the JBoss Application Server.  The tl;dr on Immutant is that it provides many of the same infrastructure services that many “platforms” provide (e.g. clustered queuing, caching, distributed transactions, etc), but with a single set of well-integrated Clojure APIs that you can (relatively) easily deploy and manage on your own infrastructure.

Further, regardless of the project, Toby and Jim are always good company; it was a hoot to hang out with them for a spell! We had a great time, I hope you enjoy listening in…

(Recorded on November 16th, 2013; my apologies to Jim and Toby for the particularly bad latency on the release of the recording.)

Listen:


Or, download the mp3 directly.

Discrete Topics

(Remember to follow @MostlyLazy so you know who’s going to be on next, and can send us topics and questions!)

  • All about Immutant…
    • (…which Chas happens to use as a foundation for Docuharvest, yet another of his side projects)
  • “Platform as a service” services, e.g. Heroku & Elastic Beanstalk
  • Grizzly, a Java-based HTTP server designed to be embeddable (much like Jetty), which happens to be used as the basis for Glassfish’s web stack
  • Using nREPL and all the middleware available for it (like Piggieback via Austin for ClojureScript REPL-ing) in conjunction with Immutant
  • clojurescript.test, a maximal port of clojure.test to ClojureScript
  • double-check, a fork of Reid Draper’s simple-check property/specification testing library that can be used portably in both Clojure and ClojureScript
  • Plans for Immutant 2.0, a.k.a. “The Deuce”
  • The Immutant mascot (inspired by the Hypnotoad), probably the best thing to ever come out of a JIRA ticket:
    immutant_icon_256px_flipped
  • TorqueBox, the Ruby application platform built on top of JBoss, analogous to Immutant
  • Chas’ various Immutant hacks around programmatic queue and logging configuration (the former of which is apparently slated for addition to the official API in some form)
  • Infinispan (JBoss’ distributed in-memory key-value store) & Hotrod (its wire protocol for un-clustered client communication)
  • Shout-out to Bob McWhirter, founder of the ProjectOdd group at Red Hat (which houses Immutant, Torquebox, and others)
  • Caribou, a “dynamic web application generator with antlers”, one of the latest entries in the Clojure web framework explosion
  • Clojure Conj 2013 “recap”
  • vert.x, an “asynchronous polyglot application platform for the JVM”, and the Clojure vert.x support, which Toby wrote/maintains and talked about in his Conj talk
  • Recent fixes to Clojure (which landed in 1.6.0 alphas) to prevent memory leaks in dynamically-deployed applications
  • /ht Andy Fingerhut and Alex Miller for their recent contributions to the Clojure development process, etc.
  • ClojureScript releases are versioned in an “interesting” way, e.g. 0.0-XXXX instead of X.Y.Z. Toby asks, “Why, why, why‽”.
    • The mentioned mailing list post where this versioning scheme originally arose is here, and the ongoing documentation of it looks to be here.
  • Results from the 2013 State of Clojure and ClojureScript
  • Michael Fogus’ post and talk about the ClojureScript compiler pipeline
  • cljx, an implementation of “feature expressions”, enabling one to target both Clojure and ClojureScript from a single codebase
  • Not much of a news flash, but Mac OS X is no longer a reasonable option for (some, many?) software developers. What follows is some navel-gazing on our collective migration to Linux.
  • Powercenter 120, the first computer that Chas bought new
  • Russ Olsen’s “To the Moon” Conj 2013 talk

P.S.

Just prior to finishing these show notes, I asked Jim and Toby what pictures of themselves they wanted to go along with the episode. Their (mostly) prosaic, perfectly-fine twitter avatar headshots came first, but then Jim was kind enough to direct my attention to this gem:

toby2

Yes, that’s a kitten t-shirt / patriotic fanny pack ensemble. Don’t mind the haters, Toby, this is why we love you.


Episode 10 with Craig Andera: Training, remote work, Clojure for newcomers, and tooling

Craig AnderaCraig Andera (@craigandera) has been using and speaking about Clojure for years, especially notably of late as the tireless host of the long-running Relevance podcast, where he has interviewed a wide array of personalities (both inside and outside of Relevance, where he is a full-time Clojure developer) that impact and influence Clojure and the space around it.

This episode of Mostly Lazy is quite different from prior episodes in that it is effectively Part II of a longer conversation that started in Episode #31 of the Relevance podcast, where Craig interviewed Chas about Clojure Programming, the state of Clojure broadly writ, 100% time, and other things.  If you haven’t listened to that yet, you should go do so now, before listening to this!

Enjoy!

(Recorded on April 19th, 2013.)

Listen:


Or, download the mp3 directly.

Discrete Topics

Many questions and topics came from tweets to @MostlyLazy (watch for scheduled show announcements and send us topics and questions!)

  • Craig interviewing Chas on the Relevance Podcast #31
  • Fogus should “guest” host on Mostly Lazy!
  • DevelopMentor
  • The grind of technical training
  • Craig’s history consulting for Microsoft on MSDN (among other things)
  • Contrasting the Microsoft and open source mindsets/populations…mac_vs_pc
  • “Everyone likes to build products for people like themselves…”
  • Using Cygwin and Virtualbox to form a workable development environment on Windows
  • VimScript (of all things)
  • “The Rich Hickey Dream”: Clojure + ClojureScript + Datomic
  • Pedestal, Relevance‘s “open source tool set for building web applications in Clojure”
  • Product businesses vs. consulting
  • Ben Vandgrift’s appearance on the Relevance podcast
  • “The Clojure community is not welcoming to newcomers.” (paraphrasing)
  • “Why Clojure sucks, and why you’ll love it anyway” (Chas’ talk @ ClojureWest 2012)
  • ANN: Mostly Lazy to be renamed to Mostly Navel Gazing
  • Craig’s remote working setup & the experience of pairing
  • The value/process of user interface / user experience design, storyboarding, etc
  • Vim vs. Emacs (yes, seriously :-P)
  • “Alternative” Clojure tools:
  • The role and state of podcasting as a medium

Episode 9 with Kevin Lynagh and Paul deGrandis: web dev ennui, CRDTs, and core.logic

Paul deGrandisKevin Lynagh

Paul deGrandis (@ohpauleez) and Kevin Lynagh (@lynaghk) are two anchors of the Clojure community, perhaps especially of the ClojureScript wing.  Both Portlanders, they’ve been elbow-deep in core.logic and a ton of ClojureScript tools and libraries like shoreleave, cljx, c2, and more.  They’ve stormed the Clojure world in the past year or two, going from zero to taking up residence in #clojure to speaking about Clojure and ClojureScript everywhere.

Kevin is the founder of Keming Labs, which specializes in “building data-driven UIs”; Paul has worked at all sorts of places like Etsy, Comcast, and TutorSpree.

Enjoy!

(Recorded on December 14th, 2012.  Apologies for the clipping on Paul’s audio. Donations welcome to help get him get an internet connection that doesn’t use carrier pigeons. ;-)

Listen:


Or, download the mp3 directly.

Discrete Topics

Many questions and topics came from tweets to @MostlyLazy (watch for scheduled show announcements and send us topics and questions!)


Episode 8: Phil Hagelberg; empowering userspace in Heroku, Leiningen, and Emacs

Phil HagelbergPhil Hagelberg (a.k.a. technomancy just about everywhere) has been a constant presence in the Clojure world for years.  Best known for starting the Leiningen project — which he continues to maintain as part of his duties at Heroku — Phil has had his fingers in all sorts of open source pots, including Clojure itself, a big pile of Clojure libraries, and the packaging and distribution infrastructure around Emacs (thus foreshadowing Leiningen to a certain degree?).

We talked about many of these topics (recorded on 8/31/2012, BTW), but one theme that kept coming up throughout our conversation was the notion of empowering userspace; that is, ensuring that users of a system have nearly (or exactly?) as much power available to them as the system’s original creators.  This is something that Phil has written about recently, where he dubbed a particular approach to empowering userspace as the “Emacs Way”…a strategy that has yielded great dividends in Leiningen and Clojure both.

Enjoy!

Listen:


Or, download the mp3 directly.

Discrete Topics


Episode 7: Anthony Grimes; tools and projects; minimum viable snippets

Chris HouserI had a lot of fun catching up with Anthony Grimes (@IORayne on Twitter and Raynes in #clojure irc). One of the most prolific Clojure programmers I know (in terms of project count anyway!), Anthony has been a fixture in the community for years, and was the “sponsoree” of the 2010 Clojure Conj scholarship. He works at Geni, helping to make their social ancestry site more awesome every day, but we talked about all sorts of stuffs.

Enjoy!

Listen:


Or, download the mp3 directly.

Discrete Topics


Episode 6: Chris Houser; Clojure surveys; getting the “little things” right in languages; Yegge-rama; ClojureScript REPLs

Chris Houser

I was stoked to reboot Mostly Lazy by talking yesterday with Chris Houser (a.k.a. Chouser), this time via Skype.  It’s good to be back!

Enjoy!

Listen:


Or, download the mp3 directly.

Discrete Topics

Finally, a non sequitur: Chris kindly responded to my RFY (Request for Yak) with this fine example of an indecently-shaven specimen:

An indecently-shaved yak


Episode 0.0.5: Chris Houser at Clojure Conj 2011

Recorded November 12th, 2011, the fourth and final recording in a series of conversations from Clojure Conj 2011.

Chris Houser (usually known as chouser online) has been working with Clojure longer than nearly anyone else; he started tinkering with the language in early 2008, and was a fixture in #clojure irc and on the mailing list for years.  His contributions to the language, early libraries, and community through his always genial and insightful presence are hard to overstate.  More recently, he has coauthored the excellent Joy of Clojure along with Michael Fogus, and is now working with Clojure daily over at Lonocloud.

It’s been my privilege to know and work with Chris a bit over the years, and, as always, it was great to talk with him in person.

Enjoy!

Listen:


Or, download the mp3 directly.

Discrete Topics

  • “Everything I learned, I [learned] on irc?!”
  • Macros (a.k.a. “compile time metaprogramming”) in Scala? Project Kepler
  • Rich Hickey once made a visit to the Western Mass. Developer’s Group, and delivered one of his great early talks on Clojure, complete with an ants demo.  My post on the event, and video.
  • “Tooling is a canard.”
  • Chouser wrote “the first ClojureScript” years ago, a proof of concept using JavaScript as a host for a Clojure implementation.  (Don’t go looking for it, I think it’s dropped off the internets by now; check out the “real” ClojureScript if you want a Clojure for JavaScript.)
  • error-kit — don’t use that though, you should almost surely use Slingshot instead for advanced error handling

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